Tag Archives: Judo

Martial Arts • Fighting Science • 5 • Yin ☯ Yang of Empty vs. Full Cups

Entering a new dojo or training facility requires humility and respect. Maybe the instructor is young or small in stature – don’t judge a book by its cover. You are a guest in their gym. Respecting a new gym requires courage and confidence. You are admitting to everyone that you don’t know something, but are willing to spend the time and effort to listen and learn.

Learning is about checking your ego at the door.
What kind of student are you?

There are three types of students:

  • Empty-Cups • These are students who have the complete courage to enter a new facility and learn a new craft. They want to learn new techniques and new degrees of freedom. They ware willing to have the instructor fill their cup with knowledge and experience. These students are the easiest to teach because they absorb information like a sponge. Techniques they learn are not only be adopted for that session but will be treated as their personal “laws” to be adopted as part of their training repertoire  – from that point onward.
  • Full-Cups • At the opposite end of the spectrum are students who enter a new gym with big egos, or their personality is overshadowed by insecurity. They don’t have the courage or willingness to lower their guard and learn something new. Their cup may be full from another discipline or gym. So what is their motivation? Maybe they want to “fight-out” their daily frustrations on unsuspecting students, or prove their toughness in a new gym. Maybe they have low self-esteem and don’t have the confidence to lower their guard and admit they don’t know something. These students are the most challenging to teach because the artificial barriers they have created must be broken down first before teaching can begin.
  • Cups-with-Holes • These are students who listen to the instructor for a brief moment and forget or discount what you told them, once you leave. They don’t have the patience or interest to adopt a new technique for longer than the teacher is giving them attention. They treat the instructor’s guidance as temporary. This may be due to a lack of respect for the gym or instructor. Other times it may be due to not realizing that what they are being told is “law” that needs to be adopted from that day forward.

The best students are Empty-Cups – it is enough to tell them once, and the instructor’s mission is accomplished.

As an instructor, I try to understand the type of student standing across from me. If they are a Full-Cup student, my time is ill spent. If they are a Cup-with-Holes then I try to explain that what I am teaching is not temporary – it’s “law”. They should adopt that law from that point onward – at least until something better comes along. Cup-with-Holes students require a lot of patience because they need to be told repetitively what is correct before they finally realize the importance of what you are teaching them.

About the Author

Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom and currently trains with Karel Ferus in Prague at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz. More recently he focuses on circuit training, strength & conditioning, and kickboxing.

Martial Arts • Fighting Science Series

If you would like to read more articles in this “Yin Yang of Fighting Science” series, check out these posts:

• 1 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Power
• 2 • Yin Yang of Speed vs. Timing
• 3 • Yin Yang of Fighting Styles
• 4 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Instinct
• 5 • Yin Yang of Empty vs. Full Cups
• 6 • Yin Yang of Slow vs. Fast
• 7 • Yin Yang of Perception vs. Reality
• 8 • Yin Yang of Fear vs. Confidence
• 9 • Yin Yang of Threes
• 10 • Yin Yang of Burden vs. Privilege
• 11 • Yin Yang of Anticipation vs. Surprise
• 12 • Yin Yang of Compliance vs. Resistance
• 13 • Yin Yang of Attacking vs. Defending
• 14 • Yin Yang of Fighting 360°
• 15 • Yin Yang of Teachers vs. Students
• 16 • Yin Yang of Physics vs. Physiology
• 17 • Yin Yang of Vulnerability vs. Opportunity
• 18 • Yin Yang of Martial Arts vs. Combat
• 19 • Yin Yang of Sport vs. Violence
• 20 • Yin Yang of Rhythm vs. Random
• 21 • Yin Yang of Stability
• 22 • Yin Yang of Strategy vs. Tactics
• 23 • Yin Yang of Instinct vs. Reason
• 24 • Yin Yang of Unstoppable vs. Immovable

• Fighting Science • Fighter’s Curve
• Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Martial Arts • Fighting Science • 4 • Yin ☯ Yang of Technique vs. Instinct

As discussed in last week’s post, combat training is about learning new degrees of freedom – adding new maneuvers or techniques that have never been tried before. But how to learn a new move well enough that it becomes natural or instinctive? Enter the 100-1000-10000 rule:
  • Mechanics If you do a technique 100 times you will understand its mechanics. Your brain will comprehend how to do it correctly, and why the movement is valuable.
  • Natural When you do a technique 1000 times it will become natural. This threshold is passed when the movement feels right in sparring. The movement becomes part of your combat portfolio.
  • Instinctive Once you do a maneuver 10000 times then it enters your subconscious. The movement can now be executed without thinking about it.

The 100-1000-10000 rule is fundamental to combat sports
and applies to the highest levels of professional fighting.

It’s important to clarify that these movements must be done correctly for it to successfully traverse the 100-1000-10000 evolution. Counting doesn’t begin until the technique is done correctly. Doing a maneuver incorrectly leads to bad habits that are hard to break.

If fighting requires surprise and spontaneity, why practice repetition? A fighter needs repetition in order for a new technique to enter the subconscious. Once that is achieved a fighter no longer needs to think of the technique because it’s apart of them. It’s as close to “instinctive behavior” as possibly achievable.

Instinctive maneuvers are the end-game because the moment a fighter “thinks” of performing an attack, defense, or anything in between – then telegraphing occurs and time is lost. An experienced fighter can exploit this delay. Reactionary measures in times of stress, emotion and chaos are worsened, if not completely lost. Practicing a move mitigates this weakness because the “thinking” component is removed from the fighting equation and the movement becomes instant.

Techniques are abandoned in the midst of chaos
and requires confidence and experience
to regain composure.

Repetition is a challenge for students, and especially taxing on millennials. In a one hour session, even 50 reps challenge the patience of students. Reaching 1000 requires grit, endurance, and resources that fall amongst the most dedicated. Striving for 10000 is reserved for the elite among us.

To finish off, it’s worth mentioning that the 100-1000-10000 rule can be easily applied to other disciplines – e.g. dancing, learning a musical instrument, software development to name a few examples, and can be a representation of time (100-1000-10000 hours) with the same effect.

About the Author

Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom and currently trains with Karel Ferus in Prague at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz. More recently he focuses on circuit training, strength & conditioning, and kickboxing.

Martial Arts • Fighting Science Series

If you would like to read more articles in this “Yin Yang of Fighting Science” series, check out these posts:

• 1 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Power
• 2 • Yin Yang of Speed vs. Timing
• 3 • Yin Yang of Fighting Styles
• 4 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Instinct
• 5 • Yin Yang of Empty vs. Full Cups
• 6 • Yin Yang of Slow vs. Fast
• 7 • Yin Yang of Perception vs. Reality
• 8 • Yin Yang of Fear vs. Confidence
• 9 • Yin Yang of Threes
• 10 • Yin Yang of Burden vs. Privilege
• 11 • Yin Yang of Anticipation vs. Surprise
• 12 • Yin Yang of Compliance vs. Resistance
• 13 • Yin Yang of Attacking vs. Defending
• 14 • Yin Yang of Fighting 360°
• 15 • Yin Yang of Teachers vs. Students
• 16 • Yin Yang of Physics vs. Physiology
• 17 • Yin Yang of Vulnerability vs. Opportunity
• 18 • Yin Yang of Martial Arts vs. Combat
• 19 • Yin Yang of Sport vs. Violence
• 20 • Yin Yang of Rhythm vs. Random
• 21 • Yin Yang of Stability
• 22 • Yin Yang of Strategy vs. Tactics
• 23 • Yin Yang of Instinct vs. Reason
• 24 • Yin Yang of Unstoppable vs. Immovable

• Fighting Science • Fighter’s Curve
• Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Martial Arts • Fighting Science • 3 • Yin ☯ Yang of Fighting Styles

Each martial art has a set of pre-defined techniques. These are typically defined by the founder as a collection of traditional moves. In progressive styles, these techniques evolve over time.

I like to refer to a fighter’s portfolio of movements as “degrees of freedom“. New degrees of freedom adds to a student’s portfolio. For example, a boxer has two basic striking tools: their fists. Although limited in this regard, their degrees of freedom is vast. I’ll explain this in a moment. A kickboxer, on the other hand, is restricted to four striking tools: both fists and both feet. In Muay Thai, there are eight attack vectors – since elbows and knees are added. Kickboxers have twice as many striking tools as boxers, and Muay Thai practitioners have double yet again. In street fighting there are no limits – strikes may come from headbutts, foot stomps, and other nasty attacks. But degrees of freedom extend beyond a style’s striking tools.

Every combat sport can be broken down to a granular level of attack vectors, defensive moves, and maneuvers. Let’s say that a kickboxer has 100 degrees of freedom, meaning that they have 100 ways of moving, defending, and attacking. A boxer, on the other hand, may have 500 degrees of freedom. How is this possible when they have only two attack vectors? It’s because boxers learn to “dance”. They are experts in slipping, bobbing, weaving – in and out of range. A kickboxer learns how to play with distance, but doesn’t learn the intricacies of phone-booth fighting at such a granular level, compared to a boxer. For example, a Karate Ka learns forward, backward, and side to side movement, but doesn’t learn the hook (punch), nor do they learn to slip. Where a Karateka learns to block, a boxer prefers to slip because they consider blocking a waste of motion and adds delay to their counter-strike. For this reason, many martial artists facing boxers are confronted with movements completely foreign to them. For every maneuver, a boxer may know five to ten more. This gives the boxer much more latitude in how they dance in and out of their opponent’s range.

Each technique adds new degrees of freedom
to a fighter’s portfolio.

A boxer is well versed in “phone booth” fighting. In this close range, they are most powerful. But against a kickboxer, a boxer has challenges of their own, since they need to watch for foot attacks. In a confrontation, the kickboxer wants to maintain distance, while the boxer wants to slip into phone booth range. A boxer knows that in close range the kickboxer has few degrees of freedom, and this is a weakness they want to exploit. A good boxer can confuse their opponent to the extent they have no idea what to expect, and when or where the next attack will occur. They can “hypnotize” their opponent with movement. Understanding your opponent’s strengths and weaknesses is an essential part of combat sports.

In classic martial arts, tradition overrules transformation.

A traditional martial art may significantly restrict a student’s degree of freedom, effectively creating a glass ceiling. They are only “allowed” to learn a set of moves, specific to that style. Traditional approach says, “in our club, we do techniques this way, so you need to learn our way”. In this sense, tradition overrules progressiveness. Modern martial arts, such as MMA don’t restrict learning, dispelling the notion that there is a right or wrong way to a given technique. MMA assesses a technique on the merits of its effectiveness as compared to techniques that preceded it. Each technique is challenged in real combat. Progressive martial arts works on the premise that, “currently this is the best techniques until someone comes up with a better one”.

About the Author

Graphic - Martial Arts, Fighting Science (smaller)

Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom and currently trains with Karel Ferus in Prague at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz. More recently he focuses on circuit training, strength & conditioning, and kickboxing.

Martial Arts • Fighting Science Series

If you would like to read more articles in this “Yin Yang of Fighting Science” series, check out these posts:

• 1 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Power
• 2 • Yin Yang of Speed vs. Timing
• 3 • Yin Yang of Fighting Styles
• 4 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Instinct
• 5 • Yin Yang of Empty vs. Full Cups
• 6 • Yin Yang of Slow vs. Fast
• 7 • Yin Yang of Perception vs. Reality
• 8 • Yin Yang of Fear vs. Confidence
• 9 • Yin Yang of Threes
• 10 • Yin Yang of Burden vs. Privilege
• 11 • Yin Yang of Anticipation vs. Surprise
• 12 • Yin Yang of Compliance vs. Resistance
• 13 • Yin Yang of Attacking vs. Defending
• 14 • Yin Yang of Fighting 360°
• 15 • Yin Yang of Teachers vs. Students
• 16 • Yin Yang of Physics vs. Physiology
• 17 • Yin Yang of Vulnerability vs. Opportunity
• 18 • Yin Yang of Martial Arts vs. Combat
• 19 • Yin Yang of Sport vs. Violence
• 20 • Yin Yang of Rhythm vs. Random
• 21 • Yin Yang of Stability
• 22 • Yin Yang of Strategy vs. Tactics
• 23 • Yin Yang of Instinct vs. Reason
• 24 • Yin Yang of Unstoppable vs. Immovable

• Fighting Science • Fighter’s Curve
• Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Martial Arts • Fighting Science • 2 • Yin ☯ Yang of Speed vs. Timing

In combat sports, it is often stated:

“Timing beats Speed”

In combat training, good technique is often confused with speed. To understand good fighting technique it’s important to divide speed into three parts:

  • 1. Reaction time (how fast the body reacts to an attack)
  • 2. The execution (or the time a technique begins till it ends), and
  • 3. The pure speed that a fighter’s muscles and physique possess to execute an attack.

All students begin by learning how to minimize their reaction time to attacking and defending, by not wasting movements. Learning good techniques addresses 1. and 2. above and can take a dedicated fighter years to master. Advanced stages of fighting techniques entail “timing”:

  • Learn to read your opponent: Their movements, the techniques they use, the style they use. Do they telegraph their movements? Meaning, a little foot shuffle before kicking? Do they twitch before punching? Do they hold their breath before exerting energy? Do they load up on their punching, otherwise known as “cocking the gun”?Telegraphing can take on many forms – listening to the opponent’s breathing, watching them tense their muscles, observing needless movement before executing a strike. All of these signals giveaway an attack. Keep a poker face, and don’t give away your next move. The ability of a fighter to “explode” into an attack with minimal movement, no telegraphing, makes them faster.
  • Learn to anticipate the movements of your opponent: Which movements or attacks do they consistently repeat? How can you exploit those repetitive movements? Repetition is good in training, but not good in sparring. In fighting, repetition leads to well-versed opponents using an opponent’s repetition to their disadvantage.

Does good technique make a fighter faster? To a certain extent – Yes. But speed is about reaction time and getting a fist or foot from their home position (in guard position), to the attack position (fully extended and connecting with the target). This is the third aspect mentioned above, and age, talent and athleticism play key roles.

I teach students to attack with explosiveness and surprise, as if they are catching a fly. Catching flies requires relaxing, exhaling, and then reacting without thinking. The fastest fighters learn to move without thinking because they have practiced the move thousands of times. When a fighter needs to think of their next move, their reaction time for their brain to tell their fist or foot to move will take time – especially in front of an experienced fighter who has the experience and muscle memory to execute the same move.

About the Author

Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom and currently trains with Karel Ferus in Prague at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz. More recently he focuses on circuit training, strength & conditioning, and kickboxing.

Martial Arts • Fighting Science Series

If you would like to read more articles in this “Yin Yang of Fighting Science” series, check out these posts:

• 1 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Power
• 2 • Yin Yang of Speed vs. Timing
• 3 • Yin Yang of Fighting Styles
• 4 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Instinct
• 5 • Yin Yang of Empty vs. Full Cups
• 6 • Yin Yang of Slow vs. Fast
• 7 • Yin Yang of Perception vs. Reality
• 8 • Yin Yang of Fear vs. Confidence
• 9 • Yin Yang of Threes
• 10 • Yin Yang of Burden vs. Privilege
• 11 • Yin Yang of Anticipation vs. Surprise
• 12 • Yin Yang of Compliance vs. Resistance
• 13 • Yin Yang of Attacking vs. Defending
• 14 • Yin Yang of Fighting 360°
• 15 • Yin Yang of Teachers vs. Students
• 16 • Yin Yang of Physics vs. Physiology
• 17 • Yin Yang of Vulnerability vs. Opportunity
• 18 • Yin Yang of Martial Arts vs. Combat
• 19 • Yin Yang of Sport vs. Violence
• 20 • Yin Yang of Rhythm vs. Random
• 21 • Yin Yang of Stability
• 22 • Yin Yang of Strategy vs. Tactics
• 23 • Yin Yang of Instinct vs. Reason
• 24 • Yin Yang of Unstoppable vs. Immovable

• Fighting Science • Fighter’s Curve
• Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Martial Arts • Fighting Science • 1 • Yin ☯ Yang of Technique vs. Power

In combat sports, it is often stated:

“9 times out of 10, Technique beats Power”

This statement is poignant from a few perspectives. First of all, the conspicuous avoidance of a perfect score. Any good fighter can be knocked out by an average fighter. We’re not perfect beings. Through life, we may strive for perfection, but we also need to be practical.

That leaves us with 90% of the time when technique wins.  That there are few caveats to mention. For instance, a powerful opponent may know a few good techniques. This needs to be a consideration in an altercation. They may not have fighting experience, but we can’t underestimate any opponent and assume they have “no” experience. Misunderestimating an opponent is one of the top reasons why fights are lost. Another aspect that mitigates this statement is when the size of an opponent overshadows in weight and muscle. A 150kg Goliath has a sizeable advantage over a 70kg David, and a winning strategy of the smaller opponent will require a balance of several factors: strengths & weaknesses, speed, vs. agility, and confidence vs. psychology. We will explore these factors and many others, throughout this “Fighting Science” series.

One practicality is that most humans have the same head size and weight.  Most human heads weight around 4.5kg regardless of how heavy they are. Why is this important?  Mainly because knockouts in combat are typically from punching laterally to the chin of the opponent. An accurate hook to the chin can bring down most fighters, regardless of their stature. Through nearly 20 years of watching UFC fights, I would estimate that 80% of all head knockouts are from a hook to the chin. I was unable to find exact statistics online, but if anyone has these details, please leave a comment below.

About the Author

Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom and currently trains with Karel Ferus in Prague at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz. More recently he focuses on circuit training, strength & conditioning, and kickboxing.

Martial Arts • Fighting Science Series

If you would like to read more articles in this “Yin Yang of Fighting Science” series, check out these posts:

• 1 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Power
• 2 • Yin Yang of Speed vs. Timing
• 3 • Yin Yang of Fighting Styles
• 4 • Yin Yang of Technique vs. Instinct
• 5 • Yin Yang of Empty vs. Full Cups
• 6 • Yin Yang of Slow vs. Fast
• 7 • Yin Yang of Perception vs. Reality
• 8 • Yin Yang of Fear vs. Confidence
• 9 • Yin Yang of Threes
• 10 • Yin Yang of Burden vs. Privilege
• 11 • Yin Yang of Anticipation vs. Surprise
• 12 • Yin Yang of Compliance vs. Resistance
• 13 • Yin Yang of Attacking vs. Defending
• 14 • Yin Yang of Fighting 360°
• 15 • Yin Yang of Teachers vs. Students
• 16 • Yin Yang of Physics vs. Physiology
• 17 • Yin Yang of Vulnerability vs. Opportunity
• 18 • Yin Yang of Martial Arts vs. Combat
• 19 • Yin Yang of Sport vs. Violence
• 20 • Yin Yang of Rhythm vs. Random
• 21 • Yin Yang of Stability
• 22 • Yin Yang of Strategy vs. Tactics
• 23 • Yin Yang of Instinct vs. Reason
• 24 • Yin Yang of Unstoppable vs. Immovable

• Fighting Science • Fighter’s Curve
• Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 41 • Taci & Gabičko • Judo & Karate

• All three Dusil brothers were active in Košice judo until they emigrated in 1968 and 1969. Two years after our arrival my uncle and his family moved to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and began training at the Kawasaki’s Rendokan Judo Academy. We moved to Burlington in 1973 and my father joined him, to train under Sensei KawasakiMitchell Kawasaki was a elite athlete, representing Canada in the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in Greco-Roman wrestling. I also trained at the Rendokan Academy with my cousin Roman, but we mainly fooled around at the back of the dojo for most of the session.

• When I turned fifteen I decided to take up martial arts again. My attraction was to the striking disciplines rather than grappling, so I decided to try Karate. It just so happened that my mother’s painting instructor’s husband, Ray Davis, was a Shotokan Karate (松濤館) Sensei. He held a fifth dan black belt at the time. On my first day Sensei Davis gave me a personal lesson. That was uncommon, since normally a blue or brown belt would teach a beginner on their first day. I was hooked from the start. After four years I graded for my black belt in my final year of high school. My training continued throughout university.

• In my final year of university studies I met Jim Flood, a world champion martial artist, also with a background in Karate. He had recently opened his own club. For the next two years I trained at Floods Positive Impact Martial Arts in Hamilton. I taught children and adult classes as well. It was the best training facility in the region. Tuesday were memorable because Jim would invite black belts from any school, to come and spar for free. In the early 90’s before Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) began, it was a unique chance for us to learn from different styles. It was a positive and motivational atmosphere. Jim had us check our egos at the door.

• Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Judo, you can find them here:

• Taci

If you missed the other Taci posts, you can link to them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 6 minutes

72 - Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo)
72 – Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo)
72 - Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 - Brampton · Gabriel & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton · Gabriel & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
72 - Brampton - Robert Sr., Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton – Robert Sr., Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 - Brampton - McCann & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton – McCann & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
79.May.1 - Košice · Csaba & Richard Kende (judo, Komunisticky sprievod)
79.May.1 – Košice · Csaba & Richard Kende (judo, Komunisticky sprievod)
95 - Košice · Csaba Kende (5th dan)
95 – Košice · Csaba Kende (5th dan)

 

• Documents & Articles

69.Dec.10 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Východoslovenské noviny, Zo snemovania judistov Lokomotivy Košice)
69.Dec.10 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Východoslovenské noviny, Zo snemovania judistov Lokomotivy Košice)
73.Feb.7 - Brampton · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Daily Times, Sports Wear Many Faces)
73.Feb.7 – Brampton · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Daily Times, Sports Wear Many Faces)
73.Feb.7 – Brampton · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Daily Times, Self Defense & Fitness)

 

72 - Brampton - Robert Sr., Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo, premiere pro)

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 24 • Košice Judo • Memories of Judo, III

• Introduction by Ing. Maria ‘Cuna’ Cabanová • 2005 April 20 • Translation & Editing by Gabriel Dusil

• Judo and the judoka of Košice shaped who I am today. I decided on my university education thanks to my coach Kajo Dusil, who thoroughly prepared me for my entrance exams to the Technical University Faculty of Metallurgy. The School of Economics, where I went did not adequately prepare me for technical school.

• When circumstances permitted, I tried to assist the Košice Judo Association in later years. In September 1978, I celebrated ten years as president of the Regional Association of Judo. I succeeded Edita Pačajová-Kardosová who stepped back to the mat as a trainer. I handed off this role to Marta Ujjobágyiova-Kelemenová and Erika Tordová-Királyová. At the time, women’s judo was completely separate from the men. The women were part of Lokomotíva Košice and men trained primarily in TJ VSŽ (Telovýchovná jednota Východoslovenské železiarne). I often offered my coaching assistance to the men’s team of Košice Judo. Helping me extensively were Laco Pačaj, Peter Széky and Jaro Plávka. Summer camps for the girls were organized by Csaba Kende. I coached periodically until 1992, before leaving for Bratislava to work. Then I raised my coaching qualification to class II, and graded successfully for my first dan, black belt.

• In judo I held various roles, such as chairwoman of the political-educational Commission for the District Judo Association, which at the time of the totalitarian regime was extremely important and had been one of the most important evaluation criteria for the sport. I worked as the President of the Judo Association and in that time we formed a joint association with karate. The Slovak Association of Judo awarded me an honorary second degree black belt for my contribution. At the elementary school in Barca (where I take my grandchildren) I led the judo team. I have now fulfilled my dream as a grandmother-judoka.

• It’s not my objective to just document the facts. These are my personal experiences and memories that others might remember differently. In closing, I must thank all judoka who shaped me, helped me and who are still my good friends. Mainly; Erika and Kajo Dusil, my lifelong friends; Csaba Kende, who devoted one summer for the preparation of my first dan black belt, and coached me through the final stages of my class II coaching certificate; Jaro Plávka who was my partner in my black belt grading; Laco Pačaj and Peter Széky who helped me in coaching, and with many other activities.

With reverent respect
I remember well the judoka and friends
who are no longer with us:
Vašek Dusil
Ďuri Mazánek
Julka Tóthová
Marcel Ondrík.

• Košice Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Košice Judo, you will find them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 6 minutes 20 seconds

67.Dec - Morava · x, x, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Vlado Makovsky, Csaba Kende, x & Jano Misko (station)
67.Dec – Morava · x, x, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Vlado Makovsky, Csaba Kende, x & Jano Misko (station)
67.Dec - Morava · x, x, Vlado Makovsky, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Eva Kendeova, x, Csaba Kende & Jano Misko (station)
67.Dec – Morava · x, x, Vlado Makovsky, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Eva Kendeova, x, Csaba Kende & Jano Misko (station)
66.Jun - Klánovice · Vaclav, x, & Karol Dusil (judo workshop)
66.Jun – Klánovice · Vaclav, x, & Karol Dusil (judo workshop)
66.Jun - Klánovice · x, x, Vaclav, x, Karol Dusil, x, x (judo workshop team)
66.Jun – Klánovice · x, x, Vaclav, x, Karol Dusil, x, x (judo workshop team)
66 - Košice · Marcel Ondrik. Csaba Kende, Robert Dusil, Jozef Novotny & Vaclav Dusil (Judo grading)
66 – Košice · Marcel Ondrik. Csaba Kende, Robert Dusil, Jozef Novotny & Vaclav Dusil (Judo grading)
65 - Split · Vaclav Dusil (Judo Tournament in Croatia)
65 – Split · Vaclav Dusil (Judo Tournament in Croatia)
59 - Košice · Jozef Arvay, Nyarias, Ludvik Wolf, Zerge Kaan, Laco Magyar, Papik, x, Robert Dusil, Jozef Grusecky & Vaclav Dusil (judo)
59 – Košice · Jozef Arvay, Nyarias, Ludvik Wolf, Zerge Kaan, Laco Magyar, Papik, x, Robert Dusil, Jozef Grusecky & Vaclav Dusil (judo)

 

• Documents & Articles

66.Jun.18 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Pravda, TASD RJEKA Lokomotiva VSŽ)
66.Jun.18 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Pravda, TASD RJEKA Lokomotiva VSŽ)
66.Jun.3 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Československý Šport, Judo s indexom)
66.Jun.3 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Československý Šport, Judo s indexom)
65 - Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Diplom, Zá obetavú prácu)
65 – Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Diplom, Zá obetavú prácu)

59 - Košice · Jozef Arvay, Nyarias, Ludvik Wolf, Zerge Kaan, Laco Magyar, Papik, x, Robert Dusil, Jozef Grusecky & Vaclav Dusil (judo, premiere pro)

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 17 • Košice Judo • Memories of Judo, II

• Introduction by Ing. Maria ‘Cuna’ Cabanová • 2005 April 20 • Translation & Editing by Gabriel Dusil

• In 1962 the girls received their 5th kyu (yellow belt). At that time Košice did not have qualified examiners, so Ing. Robert Binder came from Bratislava. He was the founder of Slovak judo, and now over 80 year old. For me the event was significant because we were told that Mr. Binder was a very charismatic gentleman. He explained to me that judo is primarily for intellectuals and that I chose my sport correctly (at one time in my life I seriously flirted with running instead).

• I couldn’t have chosen better that the 14 years I dedicated to judo. After 45 years I can say that objectively. It was wonderful to belong to a team of smart boys and girls that were considerate, independent and responsible. After all Kajo, our coach, was only two or three years older than most of us. It was the same in the men’s team. Kajo not only secured the training schedule, but all organizational, financial and administrative issues related to the sport – and later with the Regional Judo Association. Most issues were managed by the three Dusil brothers: Robert, Vašek (unfortunately no longer with us) and Karol. When problems escalated, some of us were asked to help. I was among them, as well as Igor Fridrich. I transcribed meeting minutes and various reports that were required by the totalitarian regime. When Robert went to study in Sweden in 1967, Igor Fridrich took over management of the Regional Judo Association.

• I was never a successful competitor, but that did not hinder me, as I felt at home with the team. Kajo was in charge of all women’s age groups and performance categories, and very soon I also began to participate in coaching duties. I taught judo throws and basics to hundreds of girls. Before reaching the age of 18 I became a judge and a class III trainer. These positions sat with me more than the role of competitor. Vašek Dusil was in charge of coaching the men, and when he had other responsibilities, I’d take over.

• In addition to the activities in Košice, we promoted and established judo in other towns across Eastern Slovakia. Erika Mešterová-Dusilová and I came from railway families; we had permanent rail tickets and would go and train girls at the Central Pedagogical School (Stredna pedagogicka škola) in Prešov. We were still in high school. Great promotional events were organized in Michalovce, Slovakia and we combined that with a trip to Vienna. Our accommodations were in someone’s garage. Guarding the boys from the girls was of course, Kajo. As part of TJ Lokomotíva we were allowed to travel across all of Czechoslovakia. We used that to great effect and attended many competitions. If the girls weren’t competing we simply accompanied the boys as fans and observers.

• Košice Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Košice Judo, you will find them here:

 

• Digital Photo Restoration

 6 minutes 51 seconds

64 - Košice · x, Berco Allman, Juraj Mazanek, Miro Brožek, Adolf Kostrian, Pepo Vosecky, Csaba Kende, Igor Fridrich, Vaclav Dusil, Jozef Lemak & Jozef Arvay (judo dojo)
64 – Košice · x, Berco Allman, Juraj Mazanek, Miro Brožek, Adolf Kostrian, Pepo Vosecky, Csaba Kende, Igor Fridrich, Vaclav Dusil, Jozef Lemak & Jozef Arvay (judo dojo)
64 - Košice · Stefan Bartus, Vaclav Dusil, Pepo Vosecky & Vlado Makovsky (bridge)
64 – Košice · Stefan Bartus, Vaclav Dusil, Pepo Vosecky & Vlado Makovsky (bridge)
63 - Košice · Edo Novak, Miro Brožek, Igor Fridrich, x, Robert Dusil, Csaba Kende, Vaclav Dusil
63 – Košice · Edo Novak, Miro Brožek, Igor Fridrich, x, Robert Dusil, Csaba Kende, Vaclav Dusil
62.May.1 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil, Juraj Mazanek, Robert Dusil, Laco Hluchan, x, Ivan Spisiak, Joe Nalevanko, Vojtech Agyagos & Csaba Kende
62.May.1 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil, Juraj Mazanek, Robert Dusil, Laco Hluchan, x, Ivan Spisiak, Joe Nalevanko, Vojtech Agyagos & Csaba Kende
62 - Košice · x, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, Pepo Vosecky, Robert Dusil, x, x, x, Igor Fridrich
62 – Košice · x, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, Pepo Vosecky, Robert Dusil, x, x, x, Igor Fridrich
62 - Košice · x, x, Pepo Vosecky
62 – Košice · x, x, Pepo Vosecky
62 - Košice · x, Csaba Kende, Miro Brozek, Pepo Vosecky, x (travelling)
62 – Košice · x, Csaba Kende, Miro Brozek, Pepo Vosecky, x (travelling)

 

• Documents & Articles

66.Jun.18 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Na tohoročných)
66.Jun.18 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Na tohoročných)
69.Jun.23 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Rozšíria prvú ligu)
69.Jun.23 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Rozšíria prvú ligu)
66.Oct.15 - Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Majster Kraja, Zá obetavú prácu)
66.Oct.15 – Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Majster Kraja, Zá obetavú prácu)

 


 

62 - Košice · x, Csaba Kende, Miro Brozek, Pepo Vosecky, x (travelling, premiere pro)


 

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 13 • Košice Judo • Memories of Judo, I

• Introduction by Ing. Maria ‘Cuna’ Cabanová • 2005 April 20 • Translation & Editing by Gabriel Dusil

• I started judo in 1961. I was an economic student and my classmate and best friend Erika Mešterová persuaded me to try the sport. At the time our judo facilities were in a small building in Petrov Sad, Košice. We had to share the facilities with the TJ (Telovýchovná jednota) Lokomotíva Košice wrestlers and boxers. The room where we practiced was covered with soft mats, more suited to wrestling than for judo. The building wasn’t heated so in the winter when we came to train, the mats were covered with a layer of frost. We had to wear socks on our feet, otherwise our feet would freeze. In such cold facilities no one took it easy during training. Everyone wanted to warm up quickly with a lot of movement. After training we showered under ice-cold water.

• After completion of the indoor swimming pool in Košice in 1963, our building became part of the swimming community, so we no longer had a place to train. In early September the team organized a march in the center of town with a goal to find a new gym. The event was a success and for some time we rolled around in Room 4 of the Technical University’s dormitory on Vysokoškolska ulice (street). Later we moved to the school gymnasium on Gemerská street. We also bought our own mats, ordered by Robert Dusil somewhere in Bohemia. The training facilities weren’t only for judoka so we only had a few reserved hours each week. The girls needed to train with the boys. Men trained under the guidance of Vašek and Robert Dusil, and the girls were under the leadership of Karol Dusil. Each workout started with laying the mats and stretching the canvas.

• The following school year we moved to the Cadets facilities on Komenského ulici. There we had separate training from the boys, and never trained with them again. In later years we also trained on Podhradová. When I first arrived, the girls were trained by Juraj Mazánek, aka. Hoszu. After a short time he was replaced by Dušan Halász, who we called Marmot. When he departed to military service Karol Dusil took over. Kajo, as we all called him, gave his entire soul to coaching. The first championships titles for Czechoslovakia were awarded to Julka Tóthová in Nuremberg, Germany in 1962 (Unfortunately she is no longer among us). Next champions were Božena Glaubicova-Mikušákova and Hanka Demáčkova in Košice in 1966. The most successful year for women’s Košice judo was in 1967. The Czechoslovakian championship that year was held in Žilina. Winning in their weight classes were Juca Ujjobbágyova, Erika Tordová-Királyová, Valika Zelenayová-Záhradníková and Maja Polončáková. In 1968 in Prague, additional championship titles were won by Milka Kojecká-Mišková and Božena Glaubicova. Gold metals were also awarded to Marta Ujjobágyová and Magda Antolíková. At that time, Košice women’s judo was the best team in Czechoslovakia. In 1968 in Košice took first place in the unofficial national championships. Kajo trained the women until he immigrated to Canada in September 1969.

• Košice Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Košice Judo, you’ll find links to them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 5 minutes 51 seconds

62 - Košice · Pepo Vosecky, Ivan Krizko, Mato Mohr, Robert, Vaclav Dusil & Csaba Kende
62 – Košice · Pepo Vosecky, Ivan Krizko, Mato Mohr, Robert, Vaclav Dusil & Csaba Kende
62 - Košice · Pepo Vosecky (judo flip)
62 – Košice · Pepo Vosecky (judo flip)
61 - Nitra · Edo Novak, x, x, Robert & Vaclav Dusil, Joe Nalevanko, (judo)
61 – Nitra · Edo Novak, x, x, Robert & Vaclav Dusil, Joe Nalevanko, (judo)
61 - Košice · x, Halasz, x, Jozef Grusecky, Nalevanko, Kende, Nyaryas, Ivan Spisak, Juraj Mazanek, Vlado Babilonsky, Pavel Petrivalsky, x, x, Urban, Vojtech Agyagos, Laco Hluchan, x, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 – Košice · x, Halasz, x, Jozef Grusecky, Nalevanko, Kende, Nyaryas, Ivan Spisak, Juraj Mazanek, Vlado Babilonsky, Pavel Petrivalsky, x, x, Urban, Vojtech Agyagos, Laco Hluchan, x, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 - Košice · Sano Drabcak, Edo Novak, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 – Košice · Sano Drabcak, Edo Novak, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 - Košice · Juraj Bialko, Erika Mesterova-Dusilova, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, x, x, x, Vaclav Dusil (station)
61 – Košice · Juraj Bialko, Erika Mesterova-Dusilova, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, x, x, x, Vaclav Dusil (station)
60 - Košice · Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav, Robert Dusil, Ludvik Wolf, Juraj Mazanek & Ladislav Magyar (judo dojo)
60 – Košice · Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav, Robert Dusil, Ludvik Wolf, Juraj Mazanek & Ladislav Magyar (judo dojo)

 

• Documents & Articles

66.Jun.18 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Lokomotivy VSŽ Košice)
66.Jun.18 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Lokomotivy VSŽ Košice)
68.Dec.10 - Bratislava · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Šport Bratislava, Judisti Lokomotiva Košice do 1. ligy)
68.Dec.10 – Bratislava · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Šport Bratislava, Judisti Lokomotiva Košice do 1. ligy)
69.Jun.26 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Žiakom dosť mužom málo)
69.Jun.26 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Žiakom dosť mužom málo)

 


 

60 - Košice · Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav, Robert Dusil, Ludvik Wolf, Juraj Mazanek & Ladislav Magyar (judo dojo, premiere pro)


Martial Arts • Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Graphic - Martial Arts, Fighting Science (smaller)• There are three zones in stand-up combat. Each one is represented by a circle around the fighter. The largest is the white zone, where the fighter can’t reach the opponent with their fist or foot. The gray zone is where they are close enough to hit the opponent. The red zone is where both fighters are so close to each other it’s as if they’re fighting in a “phone booth”. Each fighter has different zone sizes determined by the length of their limbs. The gray zone is slightly wider for kicks than for punches because legs are usually longer than arms. Understanding your own zone borders and those of the opponent increases the fighter’s tactical advantage.

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_white & Gray Zone

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Red zone, boxing• A fighting tactic is to force your opponent into a zone where they are most uncomfortable. One approach towards this goal is to understand the comfort zone of different fighting styles. For instance, a key difference between Karate (空手) and boxing is that Karate practitioners prefers to fight along the border of the white and gray zone. On the other hand, boxers and Muay Thai fighters prefer to fight between the gray and red zones. Fighting in the gray zone is often called, “the pocket”. Boxers will stay in hitting range and use footwork and head movement to avoid attacks while counter-striking. Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Red Zone, wrestlingThis gray zone tactic allows the fighter to quickly transition to the red zone where they can inflict a lot of damage. A Karate ka (i.e. Karate student) in the red zone is completely out of their comfort zone, whereas boxers are well versed in this zone.

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Black zone, grappling

• A street fight can start in the white zone but quickly finish in the red zone, as if ignoring the gray zone entirely. A bar fight could start in the red zone and finish on the ground. This is called the black zone. Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Red to Black Zone, judoIt’s where Judoka, wrestlers, and jiu-jitsu fighters are experts. Likewise, transitioning from the red zone to the black zone lies in the expertise of judo, wrestling, and Aikido.

• Strikers hate the black zone because it’s foreign territory. Likewise, grapplers such as judoka and wrestlers hate the gray and white zone because they’re not quite close enough to grab onto an arm or leg. Grapplers need to get a hold of their opponent’s limbs and take them quickly to the ground, where they can dominate. This may require transitioning from the white zone directly to the red zone – a wrestling technique known as “shooting”, such as “shooting for a double leg”. Fighters should avoid the zone where their opponent is strongest. If this is not possible then a tactical approach is to stay in the zone where they have a weight, or experience advantage over the opponent.

• I trained in Shotokan (松濤館) in the 80’s, and also sparred with other disciplines like kickboxers, Taekwondo practitioners, and other Karate disciplines. We learned that each style had it’s strengths and weaknesses, but even then it was clear that a student of many disciplines would be very powerful. In February of 1988 Bloodsport was released in the theaters starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. His character Frank Dux travels to Hong Kong to fight in a martial arts tournament where the best from each martial art fight. In the martial arts community this movie fueled our debate as to which style would prevail. I came from a judo base, since my father and uncles were all back belts, so for me the debate began a generation earlier. Five years after Bloodsport, the UFC was launched in November 1993. This was the first widely televised tournament to test the strengths of different fighting styles. In fact, it was the goal of the legend, Hélio Gracie, one of the founders of Gracie and Brazilian jiu-jitsu was the best martial art in the world.  He went one step further and didn’t even send his best son Rickson Gracie to the tournament. Sending instead his modest looking 175lbs son, Royce Gracie. It was as if to send a message to the world, “I won’t even send my best son, and we will still win.” That was certainly the case, and the Gracie family’s name was indelibly stamped in Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) history.

• Over the next twenty two years MMA has evolved into it’s own discipline. Students now learn to fight in all zones – white, gray, red and black. MMA teaches fighters to overcome the limitations of any martial art by combining the best and most effective techniques from each discipline. MMA fighters become versed in all fighting contingencies by learning the skills necessary to defend and attack in all four zones. By mixing all fighting styles, MMA has revealed four dominating disciplines:

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma, MMA)

  • Boxing has dominated because of their ability to maneuver and attack with multiple striking combinations while in the red zone. Complementing this style is Karate, Kung Fu, Taekwondo, and kickboxing, partially for their ability to transition from the white to gray zone.
  • Muay Thai extends the boxer’s arsenal by including three additional striking tools to boxing: elbows, knees, and feet (six if you count both limbs).
  • Wrestling has its greatest strength in superior grappling and in maneuvering their opponents on the ground.
  • Jujitsu has a rightful position in this four corners of MMA in their ability to “finish” the fight – either through breaking a limb, ripping ligaments, or restricting blood flow or oxygen to the brain. It’s worthwhile mentioning Judo in this mix of dominating styles because it sits nicely between Muay Thai and Jujitsu in transitioning fights from the red to the black zone.

• There is common theme among these four disciples in how MMA has evolved over the past two decades. It also answers the ultimate question of which fighting style are the most dominate – there isn’t just one – there are four styles that dominate:  Boxing and Muay Thai have proven their expertise in the red zone, while wrestling and Jujitsu have shown the same in the black zone. Expertise in all of these disciplines is the foundation of the ultimate fighter.

• Martial Arts

If you missed my Martial Arts posts, please click on them here:

About the Author

Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, teal)Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under the expertise of Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom. More recently he has focused on circuit training, conditioning, Brazilian jiu jitsu and kickboxing. Gabriel teaches both children and adults at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz.