Category Archives: Martial Arts

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 44 • Košice Judo

• Throughout the 1960’s, both the men’s and women’s judo teams in Košice were far more cohesive than the opposition. During competition they routed for each teammate with far more enthusiasm and passion. It was partially due to their deep routed friendships. Perhaps it was also due to the financial and physical hardships they shared. The team members spent a lot of time on trains – Košice is situated at the extreme East of Slovakia (Czechoslovakia at the time). So traveling from Košice to any tournament was lengthy and taxing. A trip to Prague was over 700 km and took over 11 hours. They would typically travel on overnight trains, and compete the day they arrived. A sleeping car was out of the question, because it was too expensive. An overnight train meant sitting on benches in a cabin that would hold up to eight people. The judoka learned to sleep on overhead luggage racks, or in creative places where there was a chance to stretch out. Friendships survived decades, including post-emigration, and continue to be strong today. Members often participated in many extra-curricular activities, such as hikes, camping, or going to the movies. Many teammates were best friends –  Karol Dusil, Pepo Vosecky, and Igor Fridrich were closest to my dad.

• Lokomotíva Košice was the rail company’s sport club. In the communist system, state factories sponsored various sporting sectors. So Lokomotíva had a sports organization spanning over 20 “oddiels” (translated as “sections” or “divisions”) – these oddiels were in judo, wrestling, boxing, European football, handball, basketball, etc. One perk for the judoka was relatively cheap travel costs. For instance, an express train ticket from Košice to Prague in the 1960’s would cost only 20 Czechoslovakian Koruna (around $1 American dollar in today’s exchange rate). That same retail ticket today costs €54 ($76 US$).

• Košice Judo

If you missed previous posts on Košice Judo, you can find them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 3 minutes 56 seconds

58 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (boxing gloves)
58 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (boxing gloves)

• My dad tried his hand at boxing before seriously taking up judo. When I was a kid I  remember watching Mohammad Ali on television, with my dad growing up.  I also had the privilege to accompany my dad to the 1976 Olympics in Montreal, Ontario, Canada. We attending judo and boxing events.  I later learned that Larry Holmes had fought in one of them.

 

 4 minutes 46 seconds

60 - Košice · Igor Fridrich, Miro Brozek, Juraj Mazanek, Berco Allman, Vaclav Dusil, Adolf Kostrian, Jozef Lemak, Šterc, Jozef Arvay, Csaba Kende, Pepo Vosecky
60 – Košice · Igor Fridrich, Miro Brozek, Juraj Mazanek, Berco Allman, Vaclav Dusil, Adolf Kostrian, Jozef Lemak, Šterc, Jozef Arvay, Csaba Kende, Pepo Vosecky

 

Article - Judisti Lokomotívy Košice nepostúpili
Article – Judisti Lokomotívy Košice nepostúpili

 4 minutes 13 seconds

60 - Košice · Juraj Bialko, Edo Novak, Csaba Kende, Igor Fridrich, Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav Dusil
62 – Košice · Juraj Bialko, Edo Novak, Csaba Kende, Igor Fridrich, Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav Dusil

• This is the men’s Lokomotiva Košice team. In one tournament, Edo Novak scored a spectacular Ippon against the Czechoslovakian Champion Norbert Pomp using a Ura Nage judo throw.

 

5 minutes 50 seconds

 

63 - Košice · Honorary Trophy by the City of Košice
63 – Košice · Honorary Trophy by the City of Košice

• Standing (left to right) – Karol Dusil, Edo Novak, Csaba Kende, Mr. Gonda (secretary of the Lokomotiva Košice Sport Club), Ing. Robert Binder, Pavel Petrivalsky, Juraj Bialko, Dusan Halasz • Lower row (left to right) – Robert Dusil, Vaclav Dusil, & Joe Nalevanko

• Robert Binder was the founder of Slovak Judo in Bratislava in 1954.  According to my uncle, he was a fantastic person and a great help to Lokomotiva Košice, and in the development of Košice judo.  He “belted” my uncle from yellow to brown. Joe Nalevanko coached Slavia Košice, the second Košice Judo team, consisting of mainly engineering students, but Lokomotiva Košice also retained him.

 

 3 minutes 32 seconds

65 - Split · Vaclav Dusil, Dusan Halasz, Miro Brozek, Vlado Makovsky (Judo Tournament in Slovenia)
65 – Split · Vaclav Dusil, Miro Brozek, x, Vlado Makovsky (Judo Tournament in Slovenia)

 

65 - Split · Pepo Vosecky, Miro Brozek, Vaclav Dusil, Vlado Makovsky (Judo Tournament in Slovenia)
65 – Split · Pepo Vosecky, Miro Brozek, Vaclav Dusil, Vlado Makovsky (Judo Tournament in Slovenia)

• In 1965 my dad, Pepo Vosecky, Igor Fridrich, Vlado Makovsky and Stefan Bartus went to Split, Croatia (Yugoslavia at the time). They attended a judo tournament, competing in both individual matches, and five-member team competitions. In the spring of 1967 Lokomotíva Košice men’s team went to Leipzig, East Germany for another judo tournament and a reciprocal tournament was held later that year in Košice.

• Documents & Articles

Article - Šikovní chlapi
Article – Šikovní chlapi
Article - Noví majstri v judo
Article – Noví majstri v judo
Article - Najlepší oddiel Lokomotívy Košice Judo
Article – Najlepší oddiel Lokomotívy Košice Judo

 

• Tags

Adolf Kostrian, Andrej Collak, Anna Collakova, Berco Allman, Csaba Kende, Czechoslovakia, Darina Poprenakova, Digital Restoration, Dusan Halasz, dusil.com, Edo Novak, Gabriel Dusil, Hluchan, Igor Fridrich, Ivan Spisak, Janosik Bastam, Joe Nalevanko, Jozef Arvay, Jozef Grusecky, Jozko Lemak, Julia Tothova, Juraj Bialko, Juraj Mazanek, Karol Dusil, Košice, Ladislav Kende, Lokomotiva Košice, Maria Collakova-Korytkova, Michal Korytko, Miro Brozek, Nyarjas, Orendas, Pavel Petrivalsky, Pepo Vosecky, Pista Oravec, Pozemné Stavby, Robert Binder, Robert Dusil, Sano Drabcak, Slavia Košice, Slavia Žilina, Slavo Sykorsky, Slezan Opava, Slovak Judo, Stefan Bartus, Ura Nage, Vaclav Dusil, Vašek Dusil, Vinohrady Bratislava, Vlado Babilonsky, Vojtech Agyagos

 


65 - Split · Vaclav Dusil, Miro Brozek, x, Vlado Makovsky (Judo Tournament in Slovenia, thumbnail)

 

 

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 41 • Taci & Gabičko • Judo & Karate

• All three Dusil brothers were active in Košice judo until they emigrated in 1968 and 1969. Two years after our arrival my uncle and his family moved to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and began training at the Kawasaki’s Rendokan Judo Academy. We moved to Burlington in 1973 and my father joined him, to train under Sensei KawasakiMitchell Kawasaki was a elite athlete, representing Canada in the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in Greco-Roman wrestling. I also trained at the Rendokan Academy with my cousin Roman, but we mainly fooled around at the back of the dojo for most of the session.

• When I turned fifteen I decided to take up martial arts again. My attraction was to the striking disciplines rather than grappling, so I decided to try Karate. It just so happened that my mother’s painting instructor’s husband, Ray Davis, was a Shotokan Karate (松濤館) Sensei. He held a fifth dan black belt at the time. On my first day Sensei Davis gave me a personal lesson. That was uncommon, since normally a blue or brown belt would teach a beginner on their first day. I was hooked from the start. After four years I graded for my black belt in my final year of high school. My training continued throughout university.

• In my final year of university studies I met Jim Flood, a world champion martial artist, also with a background in Karate. He had recently opened his own club. For the next two years I trained at Floods Positive Impact Martial Arts in Hamilton. I taught children and adult classes as well. It was the best training facility in the region. Tuesday were memorable because Jim would invite black belts from any school, to come and spar for free. In the early 90’s before Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) began, it was a unique chance for us to learn from different styles. It was a positive and motivational atmosphere. Jim had us check our egos at the door.

• Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Judo, you can find them here:

• Taci

If you missed the other Taci posts, you can link to them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 6 minutes

72 - Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo)
72 – Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo)
72 - Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton · Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 - Brampton · Gabriel & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton · Gabriel & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
72 - Brampton - Robert Sr., Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton – Robert Sr., Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo)
72 - Brampton - McCann & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
72 – Brampton – McCann & Vaclav Dusil (judo dojo)
79.May.1 - Košice · Csaba & Richard Kende (judo, Komunisticky sprievod)
79.May.1 – Košice · Csaba & Richard Kende (judo, Komunisticky sprievod)
95 - Košice · Csaba Kende (5th dan)
95 – Košice · Csaba Kende (5th dan)

 

• Documents & Articles

69.Dec.10 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Východoslovenské noviny, Zo snemovania judistov Lokomotivy Košice)
69.Dec.10 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Východoslovenské noviny, Zo snemovania judistov Lokomotivy Košice)
73.Feb.7 - Brampton · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Daily Times, Sports Wear Many Faces)
73.Feb.7 – Brampton · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Daily Times, Sports Wear Many Faces)
73.Feb.7 – Brampton · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Daily Times, Self Defense & Fitness)

 

72 - Brampton - Robert Sr., Vaclav & Gabriel Dusil (judo dojo, premiere pro)

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 24 • Košice Judo • Memories of Judo, III

• Introduction by Ing. Maria ‘Cuna’ Cabanová • 2005 April 20 • Translation & Editing by Gabriel Dusil

• Judo and the judoka of Košice shaped who I am today. I decided on my university education thanks to my coach Kajo Dusil, who thoroughly prepared me for my entrance exams to the Technical University Faculty of Metallurgy. The School of Economics, where I went did not adequately prepare me for technical school.

• When circumstances permitted, I tried to assist the Košice Judo Association in later years. In September 1978, I celebrated ten years as president of the Regional Association of Judo. I succeeded Edita Pačajová-Kardosová who stepped back to the mat as a trainer. I handed off this role to Marta Ujjobágyiova-Kelemenová and Erika Tordová-Királyová. At the time, women’s judo was completely separate from the men. The women were part of Lokomotíva Košice and men trained primarily in TJ VSŽ (Telovýchovná jednota Východoslovenské železiarne). I often offered my coaching assistance to the men’s team of Košice Judo. Helping me extensively were Laco Pačaj, Peter Széky and Jaro Plávka. Summer camps for the girls were organized by Csaba Kende. I coached periodically until 1992, before leaving for Bratislava to work. Then I raised my coaching qualification to class II, and graded successfully for my first dan, black belt.

• In judo I held various roles, such as chairwoman of the political-educational Commission for the District Judo Association, which at the time of the totalitarian regime was extremely important and had been one of the most important evaluation criteria for the sport. I worked as the President of the Judo Association and in that time we formed a joint association with karate. The Slovak Association of Judo awarded me an honorary second degree black belt for my contribution. At the elementary school in Barca (where I take my grandchildren) I led the judo team. I have now fulfilled my dream as a grandmother-judoka.

• It’s not my objective to just document the facts. These are my personal experiences and memories that others might remember differently. In closing, I must thank all judoka who shaped me, helped me and who are still my good friends. Mainly; Erika and Kajo Dusil, my lifelong friends; Csaba Kende, who devoted one summer for the preparation of my first dan black belt, and coached me through the final stages of my class II coaching certificate; Jaro Plávka who was my partner in my black belt grading; Laco Pačaj and Peter Széky who helped me in coaching, and with many other activities.

With reverent respect
I remember well the judoka and friends
who are no longer with us:
Vašek Dusil
Ďuri Mazánek
Julka Tóthová
Marcel Ondrík.

• Košice Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Košice Judo, you will find them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 6 minutes 20 seconds

67.Dec - Morava · x, x, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Vlado Makovsky, Csaba Kende, x & Jano Misko (station)
67.Dec – Morava · x, x, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Vlado Makovsky, Csaba Kende, x & Jano Misko (station)
67.Dec - Morava · x, x, Vlado Makovsky, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Eva Kendeova, x, Csaba Kende & Jano Misko (station)
67.Dec – Morava · x, x, Vlado Makovsky, x, Karel Hrubicek, Vaclav Dusil, Eva Kendeova, x, Csaba Kende & Jano Misko (station)
66.Jun - Klánovice · Vaclav, x, & Karol Dusil (judo workshop)
66.Jun – Klánovice · Vaclav, x, & Karol Dusil (judo workshop)
66.Jun - Klánovice · x, x, Vaclav, x, Karol Dusil, x, x (judo workshop team)
66.Jun – Klánovice · x, x, Vaclav, x, Karol Dusil, x, x (judo workshop team)
66 - Košice · Marcel Ondrik. Csaba Kende, Robert Dusil, Jozef Novotny & Vaclav Dusil (Judo grading)
66 – Košice · Marcel Ondrik. Csaba Kende, Robert Dusil, Jozef Novotny & Vaclav Dusil (Judo grading)
65 - Split · Vaclav Dusil (Judo Tournament in Croatia)
65 – Split · Vaclav Dusil (Judo Tournament in Croatia)
59 - Košice · Jozef Arvay, Nyarias, Ludvik Wolf, Zerge Kaan, Laco Magyar, Papik, x, Robert Dusil, Jozef Grusecky & Vaclav Dusil (judo)
59 – Košice · Jozef Arvay, Nyarias, Ludvik Wolf, Zerge Kaan, Laco Magyar, Papik, x, Robert Dusil, Jozef Grusecky & Vaclav Dusil (judo)

 

• Documents & Articles

66.Jun.18 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Pravda, TASD RJEKA Lokomotiva VSŽ)
66.Jun.18 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Pravda, TASD RJEKA Lokomotiva VSŽ)
66.Jun.3 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Československý Šport, Judo s indexom)
66.Jun.3 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Československý Šport, Judo s indexom)
65 - Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Diplom, Zá obetavú prácu)
65 – Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Diplom, Zá obetavú prácu)

59 - Košice · Jozef Arvay, Nyarias, Ludvik Wolf, Zerge Kaan, Laco Magyar, Papik, x, Robert Dusil, Jozef Grusecky & Vaclav Dusil (judo, premiere pro)

Martial Arts • Kickboxing at TapouT • 4 • Alica & Gabriel

14.Aug - Burlington, Tapout Kickboxing (title)

• Last December I surprised my sister by coming home for Christmas. While in Burlington, Ontario, Canada I had the privilege to train with Alica at the local TapouT MMA gym, Tapoutburlington.com. This is the forth and final workout we had together during that visit. On our final day we did a lot of sparring. So we worked on a few sparring strategies and techniques. Of course, we didn’t forget about our strength & conditioningcardio, and core strength exercises. Check out the video below.

• I love my sister, and I’m very proud of her. She is an accomplished artist, and has her own company offering Landscape Design & Horticulture services, you can find her website here: DusilDesign.com. I love you, Ali 🙂

Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, teal, Gab)

 

 

 

 

• Martial Arts

If you missed my Martial Arts posts, please click on them here:

 

• 10 minute 11 seconds

 

• Bringing Ferus Fitness Fight Club to Burlington, Ontario, Canada

• This training methodology is straight from the workout sessions of Karel Ferus, who runs his own fitness club in Prague. Details can be found at fffc.cz or https://www.facebook.com/www.ferus.cz.   If you live in Prague, or plan to visit sometime in the future, feel free to come and train with us. If you are interested in strength & conditioningcore strength, improving your cardio, or just want to learn some self defense, then come by.  For more details then feel free to leave me a comment below.

• Tags

Alica Dusil, Boxing, Burlington + Ontario + Canada, circuit training, conditioning, conditioning training, Dusil Design, Dusil Design & Landscape, dusil.com, dusildesign.com, Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fighting, fitness training + Prague, Gabriel Dusil, Karate, Karel Ferus, Kickboxing, Martial Arts, martial arts prague, Mixed Martial Arts, MMA, muay thai, Prague + Kickboxing, Prague + MMA, Praha + Kickboxing, self defense, strength + conditioning, Tapout, Tapout + Burlington, thai box, Thai Boxing


14.Dec - Burlington, Tapout Kickboxing (Alica & Gabriel, Day 4, premiere pro)

 

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 17 • Košice Judo • Memories of Judo, II

• Introduction by Ing. Maria ‘Cuna’ Cabanová • 2005 April 20 • Translation & Editing by Gabriel Dusil

• In 1962 the girls received their 5th kyu (yellow belt). At that time Košice did not have qualified examiners, so Ing. Robert Binder came from Bratislava. He was the founder of Slovak judo, and now over 80 year old. For me the event was significant because we were told that Mr. Binder was a very charismatic gentleman. He explained to me that judo is primarily for intellectuals and that I chose my sport correctly (at one time in my life I seriously flirted with running instead).

• I couldn’t have chosen better that the 14 years I dedicated to judo. After 45 years I can say that objectively. It was wonderful to belong to a team of smart boys and girls that were considerate, independent and responsible. After all Kajo, our coach, was only two or three years older than most of us. It was the same in the men’s team. Kajo not only secured the training schedule, but all organizational, financial and administrative issues related to the sport – and later with the Regional Judo Association. Most issues were managed by the three Dusil brothers: Robert, Vašek (unfortunately no longer with us) and Karol. When problems escalated, some of us were asked to help. I was among them, as well as Igor Fridrich. I transcribed meeting minutes and various reports that were required by the totalitarian regime. When Robert went to study in Sweden in 1967, Igor Fridrich took over management of the Regional Judo Association.

• I was never a successful competitor, but that did not hinder me, as I felt at home with the team. Kajo was in charge of all women’s age groups and performance categories, and very soon I also began to participate in coaching duties. I taught judo throws and basics to hundreds of girls. Before reaching the age of 18 I became a judge and a class III trainer. These positions sat with me more than the role of competitor. Vašek Dusil was in charge of coaching the men, and when he had other responsibilities, I’d take over.

• In addition to the activities in Košice, we promoted and established judo in other towns across Eastern Slovakia. Erika Mešterová-Dusilová and I came from railway families; we had permanent rail tickets and would go and train girls at the Central Pedagogical School (Stredna pedagogicka škola) in Prešov. We were still in high school. Great promotional events were organized in Michalovce, Slovakia and we combined that with a trip to Vienna. Our accommodations were in someone’s garage. Guarding the boys from the girls was of course, Kajo. As part of TJ Lokomotíva we were allowed to travel across all of Czechoslovakia. We used that to great effect and attended many competitions. If the girls weren’t competing we simply accompanied the boys as fans and observers.

• Košice Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Košice Judo, you will find them here:

 

• Digital Photo Restoration

 6 minutes 51 seconds

64 - Košice · x, Berco Allman, Juraj Mazanek, Miro Brožek, Adolf Kostrian, Pepo Vosecky, Csaba Kende, Igor Fridrich, Vaclav Dusil, Jozef Lemak & Jozef Arvay (judo dojo)
64 – Košice · x, Berco Allman, Juraj Mazanek, Miro Brožek, Adolf Kostrian, Pepo Vosecky, Csaba Kende, Igor Fridrich, Vaclav Dusil, Jozef Lemak & Jozef Arvay (judo dojo)
64 - Košice · Stefan Bartus, Vaclav Dusil, Pepo Vosecky & Vlado Makovsky (bridge)
64 – Košice · Stefan Bartus, Vaclav Dusil, Pepo Vosecky & Vlado Makovsky (bridge)
63 - Košice · Edo Novak, Miro Brožek, Igor Fridrich, x, Robert Dusil, Csaba Kende, Vaclav Dusil
63 – Košice · Edo Novak, Miro Brožek, Igor Fridrich, x, Robert Dusil, Csaba Kende, Vaclav Dusil
62.May.1 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil, Juraj Mazanek, Robert Dusil, Laco Hluchan, x, Ivan Spisiak, Joe Nalevanko, Vojtech Agyagos & Csaba Kende
62.May.1 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil, Juraj Mazanek, Robert Dusil, Laco Hluchan, x, Ivan Spisiak, Joe Nalevanko, Vojtech Agyagos & Csaba Kende
62 - Košice · x, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, Pepo Vosecky, Robert Dusil, x, x, x, Igor Fridrich
62 – Košice · x, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, Pepo Vosecky, Robert Dusil, x, x, x, Igor Fridrich
62 - Košice · x, x, Pepo Vosecky
62 – Košice · x, x, Pepo Vosecky
62 - Košice · x, Csaba Kende, Miro Brozek, Pepo Vosecky, x (travelling)
62 – Košice · x, Csaba Kende, Miro Brozek, Pepo Vosecky, x (travelling)

 

• Documents & Articles

66.Jun.18 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Na tohoročných)
66.Jun.18 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Na tohoročných)
69.Jun.23 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Rozšíria prvú ligu)
69.Jun.23 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Rozšíria prvú ligu)
66.Oct.15 - Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Majster Kraja, Zá obetavú prácu)
66.Oct.15 – Košice · Document, Vaclav Dusil (judo Majster Kraja, Zá obetavú prácu)

 


 

62 - Košice · x, Csaba Kende, Miro Brozek, Pepo Vosecky, x (travelling, premiere pro)


 

Martial Arts • Photo Restoration • 13 • Košice Judo • Memories of Judo, I

• Introduction by Ing. Maria ‘Cuna’ Cabanová • 2005 April 20 • Translation & Editing by Gabriel Dusil

• I started judo in 1961. I was an economic student and my classmate and best friend Erika Mešterová persuaded me to try the sport. At the time our judo facilities were in a small building in Petrov Sad, Košice. We had to share the facilities with the TJ (Telovýchovná jednota) Lokomotíva Košice wrestlers and boxers. The room where we practiced was covered with soft mats, more suited to wrestling than for judo. The building wasn’t heated so in the winter when we came to train, the mats were covered with a layer of frost. We had to wear socks on our feet, otherwise our feet would freeze. In such cold facilities no one took it easy during training. Everyone wanted to warm up quickly with a lot of movement. After training we showered under ice-cold water.

• After completion of the indoor swimming pool in Košice in 1963, our building became part of the swimming community, so we no longer had a place to train. In early September the team organized a march in the center of town with a goal to find a new gym. The event was a success and for some time we rolled around in Room 4 of the Technical University’s dormitory on Vysokoškolska ulice (street). Later we moved to the school gymnasium on Gemerská street. We also bought our own mats, ordered by Robert Dusil somewhere in Bohemia. The training facilities weren’t only for judoka so we only had a few reserved hours each week. The girls needed to train with the boys. Men trained under the guidance of Vašek and Robert Dusil, and the girls were under the leadership of Karol Dusil. Each workout started with laying the mats and stretching the canvas.

• The following school year we moved to the Cadets facilities on Komenského ulici. There we had separate training from the boys, and never trained with them again. In later years we also trained on Podhradová. When I first arrived, the girls were trained by Juraj Mazánek, aka. Hoszu. After a short time he was replaced by Dušan Halász, who we called Marmot. When he departed to military service Karol Dusil took over. Kajo, as we all called him, gave his entire soul to coaching. The first championships titles for Czechoslovakia were awarded to Julka Tóthová in Nuremberg, Germany in 1962 (Unfortunately she is no longer among us). Next champions were Božena Glaubicova-Mikušákova and Hanka Demáčkova in Košice in 1966. The most successful year for women’s Košice judo was in 1967. The Czechoslovakian championship that year was held in Žilina. Winning in their weight classes were Juca Ujjobbágyova, Erika Tordová-Királyová, Valika Zelenayová-Záhradníková and Maja Polončáková. In 1968 in Prague, additional championship titles were won by Milka Kojecká-Mišková and Božena Glaubicova. Gold metals were also awarded to Marta Ujjobágyová and Magda Antolíková. At that time, Košice women’s judo was the best team in Czechoslovakia. In 1968 in Košice took first place in the unofficial national championships. Kajo trained the women until he immigrated to Canada in September 1969.

• Košice Judo

If you missed my previous posts on Košice Judo, you’ll find links to them here:

• Digital Photo Restoration

 5 minutes 51 seconds

62 - Košice · Pepo Vosecky, Ivan Krizko, Mato Mohr, Robert, Vaclav Dusil & Csaba Kende
62 – Košice · Pepo Vosecky, Ivan Krizko, Mato Mohr, Robert, Vaclav Dusil & Csaba Kende
62 - Košice · Pepo Vosecky (judo flip)
62 – Košice · Pepo Vosecky (judo flip)
61 - Nitra · Edo Novak, x, x, Robert & Vaclav Dusil, Joe Nalevanko, (judo)
61 – Nitra · Edo Novak, x, x, Robert & Vaclav Dusil, Joe Nalevanko, (judo)
61 - Košice · x, Halasz, x, Jozef Grusecky, Nalevanko, Kende, Nyaryas, Ivan Spisak, Juraj Mazanek, Vlado Babilonsky, Pavel Petrivalsky, x, x, Urban, Vojtech Agyagos, Laco Hluchan, x, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 – Košice · x, Halasz, x, Jozef Grusecky, Nalevanko, Kende, Nyaryas, Ivan Spisak, Juraj Mazanek, Vlado Babilonsky, Pavel Petrivalsky, x, x, Urban, Vojtech Agyagos, Laco Hluchan, x, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 - Košice · Sano Drabcak, Edo Novak, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 – Košice · Sano Drabcak, Edo Novak, Vaclav & Robert Dusil
61 - Košice · Juraj Bialko, Erika Mesterova-Dusilova, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, x, x, x, Vaclav Dusil (station)
61 – Košice · Juraj Bialko, Erika Mesterova-Dusilova, x, x, Joe Nalevanko, x, x, x, Vaclav Dusil (station)
60 - Košice · Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav, Robert Dusil, Ludvik Wolf, Juraj Mazanek & Ladislav Magyar (judo dojo)
60 – Košice · Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav, Robert Dusil, Ludvik Wolf, Juraj Mazanek & Ladislav Magyar (judo dojo)

 

• Documents & Articles

66.Jun.18 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Lokomotivy VSŽ Košice)
66.Jun.18 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (judo Article, Rudé Právo, Lokomotivy VSŽ Košice)
68.Dec.10 - Bratislava · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Šport Bratislava, Judisti Lokomotiva Košice do 1. ligy)
68.Dec.10 – Bratislava · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Šport Bratislava, Judisti Lokomotiva Košice do 1. ligy)
69.Jun.26 - Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Žiakom dosť mužom málo)
69.Jun.26 – Košice · Vaclav Dusil (Article, Večer, Žiakom dosť mužom málo)

 


 

60 - Košice · Joe Nalevanko, Vaclav, Robert Dusil, Ludvik Wolf, Juraj Mazanek & Ladislav Magyar (judo dojo, premiere pro)


Martial Arts • Fighting Science • Fighting Zones

Graphic - Martial Arts, Fighting Science (smaller)• There are three zones in stand-up combat. Each one is represented by a circle around the fighter. The largest is the white zone, where the fighter can’t reach the opponent with their fist or foot. The gray zone is where they are close enough to hit the opponent. The red zone is where both fighters are so close to each other it’s as if they’re fighting in a “phone booth”. Each fighter has different zone sizes determined by the length of their limbs. The gray zone is slightly wider for kicks than for punches because legs are usually longer than arms. Understanding your own zone borders and those of the opponent increases the fighter’s tactical advantage.

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_white & Gray Zone

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Red zone, boxing• A fighting tactic is to force your opponent into a zone where they are most uncomfortable. One approach towards this goal is to understand the comfort zone of different fighting styles. For instance, a key difference between Karate (空手) and boxing is that Karate practitioners prefers to fight along the border of the white and gray zone. On the other hand, boxers and Muay Thai fighters prefer to fight between the gray and red zones. Fighting in the gray zone is often called, “the pocket”. Boxers will stay in hitting range and use footwork and head movement to avoid attacks while counter-striking. Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Red Zone, wrestlingThis gray zone tactic allows the fighter to quickly transition to the red zone where they can inflict a lot of damage. A Karate ka (i.e. Karate student) in the red zone is completely out of their comfort zone, whereas boxers are well versed in this zone.

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Black zone, grappling

• A street fight can start in the white zone but quickly finish in the red zone, as if ignoring the gray zone entirely. A bar fight could start in the red zone and finish on the ground. This is called the black zone. Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma)_Red to Black Zone, judoIt’s where Judoka, wrestlers, and jiu-jitsu fighters are experts. Likewise, transitioning from the red zone to the black zone lies in the expertise of judo, wrestling, and Aikido.

• Strikers hate the black zone because it’s foreign territory. Likewise, grapplers such as judoka and wrestlers hate the gray and white zone because they’re not quite close enough to grab onto an arm or leg. Grapplers need to get a hold of their opponent’s limbs and take them quickly to the ground, where they can dominate. This may require transitioning from the white zone directly to the red zone – a wrestling technique known as “shooting”, such as “shooting for a double leg”. Fighters should avoid the zone where their opponent is strongest. If this is not possible then a tactical approach is to stay in the zone where they have a weight, or experience advantage over the opponent.

• I trained in Shotokan (松濤館) in the 80’s, and also sparred with other disciplines like kickboxers, Taekwondo practitioners, and other Karate disciplines. We learned that each style had it’s strengths and weaknesses, but even then it was clear that a student of many disciplines would be very powerful. In February of 1988 Bloodsport was released in the theaters starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. His character Frank Dux travels to Hong Kong to fight in a martial arts tournament where the best from each martial art fight. In the martial arts community this movie fueled our debate as to which style would prevail. I came from a judo base, since my father and uncles were all back belts, so for me the debate began a generation earlier. Five years after Bloodsport, the UFC was launched in November 1993. This was the first widely televised tournament to test the strengths of different fighting styles. In fact, it was the goal of the legend, Hélio Gracie, one of the founders of Gracie and Brazilian jiu-jitsu was the best martial art in the world.  He went one step further and didn’t even send his best son Rickson Gracie to the tournament. Sending instead his modest looking 175lbs son, Royce Gracie. It was as if to send a message to the world, “I won’t even send my best son, and we will still win.” That was certainly the case, and the Gracie family’s name was indelibly stamped in Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) history.

• Over the next twenty two years MMA has evolved into it’s own discipline. Students now learn to fight in all zones – white, gray, red and black. MMA teaches fighters to overcome the limitations of any martial art by combining the best and most effective techniques from each discipline. MMA fighters become versed in all fighting contingencies by learning the skills necessary to defend and attack in all four zones. By mixing all fighting styles, MMA has revealed four dominating disciplines:

Graphic - Pictogram (fighter boxing kickboxing judo wrestling mma, MMA)

  • Boxing has dominated because of their ability to maneuver and attack with multiple striking combinations while in the red zone. Complementing this style is Karate, Kung Fu, Taekwondo, and kickboxing, partially for their ability to transition from the white to gray zone.
  • Muay Thai extends the boxer’s arsenal by including three additional striking tools to boxing: elbows, knees, and feet (six if you count both limbs).
  • Wrestling has its greatest strength in superior grappling and in maneuvering their opponents on the ground.
  • Jujitsu has a rightful position in this four corners of MMA in their ability to “finish” the fight – either through breaking a limb, ripping ligaments, or restricting blood flow or oxygen to the brain. It’s worthwhile mentioning Judo in this mix of dominating styles because it sits nicely between Muay Thai and Jujitsu in transitioning fights from the red to the black zone.

• There is common theme among these four disciples in how MMA has evolved over the past two decades. It also answers the ultimate question of which fighting style are the most dominate – there isn’t just one – there are four styles that dominate:  Boxing and Muay Thai have proven their expertise in the red zone, while wrestling and Jujitsu have shown the same in the black zone. Expertise in all of these disciplines is the foundation of the ultimate fighter.

• Martial Arts

If you missed my Martial Arts posts, please click on them here:

About the Author

Home - Signature, Gabriel Dusil ('12, shadow, teal)Gabriel Dusil has been a practitioner of Martial Arts for over twenty years. Originally he trained in the traditional style of Shotokan Karate. Gabriel has also trained under the expertise of Sensei Martin “Sonic” Langley in the United Kingdom. More recently he has focused on circuit training, conditioning, Brazilian jiu jitsu and kickboxing. Gabriel teaches both children and adults at the Ferus Fitness Fight Club, fffc.cz.